Measurement enhancement

Adaptation and validation of the Hong Kong Chinese Version of Oxford Cognitive Screen Plus (OCS-Plus)

Oxford Cognitive Screen (OCS) is domain-specific cognitive screening tool assessing the domains of language, praxis, number, memory, spatial and controlled attention. The tool is initially developed for stroke survivors and characterised by its inclusiveness for patients with aphasia and neglect. A computerised tablet-based version of OCS (OCS-Plus) was developed to detect more subtle cognitive changes. The current study aims to establish the normative data of OCS-Plus and validate it among cognitively healthy Chinese older adults in Hong Kong. The study is conducted in collaboration with the Hong Kong Polytechnic University and the University of Oxford.

Validation of the four subjective wellbeing measures of the Office of National Statistics (ONS4) in Hong Kong Chinese population

Measuring subjective wellbeing is of growing importance for assessing population mental health, evaluating programmes, and informing public policy. The four subjective wellbeing measures of the Office of National Statistics (ONS4) is a widely used and brief instrument for wellbeing. In this study, we aim to locally adapt this scale by translating it into Hong Kong Chinese and validating it in the Hong Kong population. Data was collected from participants of a territory-wide project of age-friendliness.

Developing a crosswalk between Montreal Cognitive Assessment 5-min (MoCA 5-min) and interRAI Cognitive Performance Scale (interRAI CPS) in older adults with mild physical or cognitive impairment

Montreal Cognitive Assessment 5-min protocol (MoCA 5-min) is a common brief screening instrument for detecting cognitive impairment and dementia in community and healthcare settings, and the Cognitive performance Scale (CPS) of the InterRAI assessment tool is a widely used tool to monitor the cognitive performance in long-term care settings. This study aims to link the scores between MoCA-5min and interRAI CPS in order to better track changes in cognition across different settings and by using different tools. Assessment data was extracted from a home- and community-based care program for older people with mild impairment in Hong Kong.